Minerals Plan: Key Issues & Options

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Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 4: A Portrait of Minerals in Derbyshire Figure 3: Significant Mineral Resources and Permitted Sites in 2009

  • Comment ID: /3997185/5
Complicated, showing too many pieces of information (type of extraction, active or inactive permissions, and area covered by the plan, all overlying geological data). The fit between the extent of identified resource, and the Landscape Character of Derbyshire character areas is striking however
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 4: A Portrait of Minerals in Derbyshire the Permitted Mineral Reserves section

  • Comment ID: /3997185/6
Permitted mineral reserves (paragraphs 4.20-4.26) - could this more clearly show the amount of permitted resource, the required apportionment, how long the reserves will last in each case - and explain why this isn't possible where it cannot be done.
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 4: A Portrait of Minerals in Derbyshire the Usage & Markets section

  • Comment ID: /3997185/7
Paragraph 4.31 - would benefit from clarification, as it may appear contradictory as "Most sand and gravel originating in Derbyshire is used within 10 - 15 miles of the pits" yet "In 2005, 21% of total sand and gravel output from Derbyshire was used within the county, with 73% being exported to elsewhere". Is most of it going to Nottingham/North Leicestershire/Staffs then?
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 4: A Portrait of Minerals in Derbyshire the Reclamation section

  • Comment ID: /3997185/8
It might be useful to highlight that operational quarries with conditions requiring restoration to agriculture, or without agreed restoration schemes are presumably old permissions, which are (I assume) already being worked on and/or picked up through the ROMP process?
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 2: Policy Context the Policy Context chapter

  • Comment ID: /3997185/1
Although MPSs are explicitly mentioned, I assume PPSs, including PPS9 are relevant considerations in the development of our MDF? By the same token, I assume the RSS is no longer relevant, although I presume that the evidence base used in the development of the RSS is still considered robust?
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part Two: Vision, Objectives, Issues & Options Chapter 5: A Vision for Minerals Development in Derbyshire the Vision for Minerals Development in Derbyshire

  • Comment ID: /3997185/9
I assume what is presented are essentially objectives for a vision. Couldn't they be more 'visionary'? For example, element 12 "restoration strategies will have been developed...". Couldn't this be "Comprehensive, area based restoration strategies have been developed for areas along the Trent valley and the A615, resulting in a holistic, visionary approach to minerals working and site restoration in these areas. Site working and restoration proposals in these areas now contribute towards a str
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 3: A General Portrait of Derbyshire the Natural Heritage section

  • Comment ID: /3997185/2
This section offers a fantastic opportunity to paint a real, insightful portrait of Derbyshire, which will be an essential component of spatial planning. Unfortunately, however, this section appears to fall well short. For example, in relation to the Natural Heritage section, only a very limited amount of information is presented in relation to ecological interests, and what is present lacks the detail and the analysis to usefully inform the emerging plan, or the consideration of the options.
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part Two: Vision, Objectives, Issues & Options Chapter 6: Plan Objectives the Plan Objectives

  • Comment ID: /3997185/10
Again, these could be strengthened: ยท Objective D - "to protect the quality of the natural and built environment" shouldn't a 20 year plan go beyond this? Instead of 'protect', shouldn't we aim to 'protect, restore, recreate, enhance and reconnect' the natural environment? In addition to 'quality', can we look at 'quantity, connectivity, sustainability' etc? Do we need to make specific reference to (just) the PDNP and DVMWHS - aren't they automatically included in this objective, or
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 3: A General Portrait of Derbyshire Figure 1: Map of Derbyshire

  • Comment ID: /3997185/3
Finally, I would suggest that Figure 1 adds little value to this section, but could be (or perhaps a series of maps should be) key to the interpretation of the Spatial portrait.
Tom French - Derbyshire County Council 18 Aug 2010

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options Part One: Background Information Chapter 4: A Portrait of Minerals in Derbyshire the Mineral Resources in Derbyshire section

  • Comment ID: /3997185/4
Mineral resources in Derbyshire - Suggest that caution is used in paragraph 4.5 in suggesting that there is an 'abundance of deposits elsewhere' particularly in relation to peat. Even if this is the case - is exploitation of this resource desirable, sustainable or practicable (given the protection applied to many such areas both nationally and internationally)?