Minerals Plan: Key Issues & Options

Derby & Derbyshire Minerals Core Strategy: Key Issues & Options

Increasing the Use of Secondary & Recycled Aggregates

7.65 Secondary aggregates are materials that are produced from other mineral operations or as industrial by-products, such as colliery spoil, quarry waste, power station ash and blast furnace slag. Recycled aggregates can similarly be sourced from a wide variety of materials, such as arisings from construction and demolition, highway maintenance, excavation and utility operations

7.66 "Securing the Future", the Government's sustainable development strategy, has two relevant key principles. These are the principles of "living within environmental limits" and "achieving a sustainable economy"; both of which would require us to make efficient or prudent use of natural resources, including primary minerals. Secondary and recycled aggregates are making an increasingly important contribution to the UK's aggregate needs.  They reduce the need and demand for quarried minerals (primary minerals) and, by re-using demolition materials as construction aggregate on site, reduce the need for material to be transported long distances to markets (the proximity principle), therefore helping to make effective and sustainable use of resources. The Government is committed, therefore, to maximising the use of secondary and recycled material in the construction industry.

7.67 Current national guidelines for the provision of aggregate minerals are based on the assumption that recycled wastes and other alternative materials will meet 23% of demand for aggregates over the period up to the end of 2016.  There is no local target for Derbyshire in terms of producing aggregate from alternative sources; however the Government assumes that the East Midlands region as a whole will produce some 95 million tonnes of alternatives to aggregates over the period between 2001 and 2016. This has enabled the regional figure for the required provision of primary land won aggregates to be at a lower level than it otherwise would be.

7.68 Policy 37 of the Regional Spatial Strategy requires that local development frameworks should identify and where necessary safeguard sites suitable for the recycling, reprocessing and transfer of materials including construction and demolition wastes. It is likely that the most appropriate sites to recycle construction & demolition wastes would be found near to where the waste is generated and where it can be re-used.  We consider that the issue of finding suitable sites is a key strategic one and is, therefore, an issue that should be addressed during the preparation of the Derby & Derbyshire Waste Core Strategy.

Issue 13: Safeguarding Sites for Recycled Aggregates (a)

Do you agree that the most appropriate place to consider the safeguarding of individual sites suitable for the recycling, reprocessing and transfer of materials including construction and demolition wastes is the Waste Core Strategy?

Option Results Count
Yes
No

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Issue 13: Safeguarding Sites for Recycled Aggregates (b)

Please explain why you came to that decision, and if you chose 'no' please suggest an alternative approach that we could take

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7.69 Mineral operations will often result in the production of waste which is often used in the restoration of quarry workings as a material to backfill workings but sometimes markets for the potential use of mineral wastes can be identified. Similarly, secondary materials that are the wastes or by products of industrial processes, for example ash from power stations, can be used as an alternative to aggregate minerals.

7.70 A particular issue for Derbyshire is that recycled and secondary aggregates are the main source of material used in the restoration of Derbyshire's sand and gravel quarries in the Trent Valley.  The increasing use of this material as a substitute for primary aggregate, therefore, leads to a reduction in the amount of inert fill material for those sand and gravel workings which have to be restored to dry land. Solutions to this issue will be considered in the Trent Valley chapter.

7.71 Nevertheless, it is important in the interests of reducing the amount of primary aggregate and thus minimising the impact on the environment that we promote the production and use of secondary and recycled aggregates.

7.72 Within Derbyshire there are a number of spoil tips related to industrial purposes or former collieries which may contain material suitable for use as secondary aggregates. However, in many cases these will have re-vegetated and should now be considered in the same way as a new site.

Issue 14: Reworking Spoil Tips for Secondary Aggregates (a)

Should we have a criteria-based policy relating to reworking of spoil tips for secondary aggregates or seek to identify specific sites where these products can be worked?

Option Results Count
Criteria based policy
Specific sites

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Issue 14: Reworking Spoil Tips for Secondary Aggregates (b)

Please explain why you came to that decision

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