Towards a Minerals Local Plan for Derbyshire and Derby

Sand and Gravel Site Assessments

Elvaston

1.4 Elvaston

Site Name: Elvaston

Reference Number: SG04

Proposed By:Tarmac

BACKGROUND

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Location and General Description of Site

1.4.1 The 50 ha site is proposed by Tarmac as an extension to the existing quarry. It is located to the north-west of the site, which received planning permission in 2013, and would continue the westerly movement of Elvaston Pit along the Derwent Valley. The site boundaries are well defined, its eastern boundary following the western boundary of the recently permitted area, its northern boundary follows the River Derwent, its western boundary follows the B5010 and its southern boundary follows an existing hedgerow.

1.4.2 The northern part of the site, south of the River Derwent and directly north-east of Elvaston Castle,comprises unimproved pasture and remnant hedgerows. The central area is predominantly arable fields with improved pasture to the south. There are occasional scattered trees of varying age and condition, a group of willows and evidence of lost hedgerows. Hedgerow condition is very variable.

Resources (yield, annual output, depth of deposit)

1.4.3 It is proposed to work some 1,500,000 tonnes of sand and gravel from a net excavation area measuring 40ha i.e. an estimated yield of tonnes per hectare 37,500 tph. The average depth of the deposit is 2.5 metres.

End Use of and Market for Mineral

1.4.4 The mineral would be used to supply local construction markets and concrete products manufacturing and ready mixed concrete manufacture, there is an existing concrete/mortar plant on site. The main market areas for the mineral would be Derby, south Derbyshire, north-east Leicestershire and south-west Nottingham.

Timing and Phasing

1.4.4 The company estimates that the annual output of the plant would be around 300,000 tpa. The estimated yield figure of 1,500,000 tonnes gives a lifespan for the site of approximately 5 years. Working is expected to follow on after the current site is worked out, estimated now to be around 2022-2023.

Additional note re: Resource

1.4.5 In order to fully utilise the deposit and ensure that sales of sand and gravel remain in step it is proposed to import 100,000 tonnes per annum of fine sand to the plant site for blending. The sand and gravel deposit is comprised of approximately 50% gravel and 50% coarse sand. Whilst it is possible to create a high grade concreting sand, to meet current market demand and concrete manufacturer's specifications, the processing of the sand deposit into a more finely grained end product would give rise to additional wastage over and above the anticipated silt fraction.

1.4.6 Fine sand would be imported from existing units in Nottinghamshire for blending with coarser in situ sand. 100,000 tonnes of fine sand would be blended with 150,000 tonnes of coarse sand per annum. Thus whilst extraction rates will be 300,000 tpa, sales will be 400,000 tpa over the lifespan of site.

1.4.7 Fine sand would be imported on a 'back haul' basis with the HGVs delivering the fine sand to the plant and then being used to convey processed mineral to the market. Given this reliance on back hauling it is estimated that at the most an additional 20 vehicle movements a day might be anticipated i.e. 10 in and 10 out.

1.4.8 Additionally the existing on-site concrete/mortar plant would also continue to import small volumes of material. As well as importing fine sand, the operator is also seeking to continue to import material for use with on-site mortar plant.

Plant and Access Arrangements

1.4.9 The site would be worked as the current site but with an extended conveyor system to serve this area. The site would be worked through the existing plant, which would need to be refurbished, and utilising existing access arrangements. Access to the plant site would be gained via a new conveyor tunnel to be constructed under Ambaston Lane and via an over ground conveyor through 'Elvaston Avenue' and across a culvert to be constructed over Ambaston Brook. All lorries would leave the plant site via the existing access road and would turn right, onto London Road, joining the main road network at Thulston Roundabout. No delivery vehicles would pass through Shardlow, or travel on Ambaston Lane or the B5010 to Borrowash.

Relevant History

1.4.10 Elvaston Pit is the extension of a pit established in the late 1960s when permission was granted for the extraction of minerals from land at Sawley Road, Draycott. Since that time workings have extended progressively westwards along the Derwent valley. The most recent workings have taken place at Bellington Hill to the south-west of Ambaston village; permission to work this site and erect a new processing plant was granted in 1988. Extraction was completed in 1998, and most of the site is being restored to agriculture following infilling with quarry and imported wastes. The area to the north of these workings to the west of Ambaston was permitted in August 2013, and is yet to be started. It will yield around 1.8 million tonnes of sand and gravel.

Adopted Minerals Local Plan

1.4.11 The deposit draft edition of the MLP allocated a larger area for working at Elvaston which included this site, along with other areas. On the recommendation of the Inspector the allocation was re-evaluated and a smaller area, which did not include this site and other parts, was allocated for working in the adopted MLP.

 

SITE ASSESSMENT

 

ECONOMIC CONSIDERATIONS

Existing Infrastructure

1.4.12 This proposal would utilise the existing quarry infrastructure.

ASSESSMENT (+) Use of existing quarry infrastructure

Sterilisation of Resources

1.4.13 The operation would continue the extraction of mineral using existing infrastructure

. ASSESSMENT (+) Continued use of mineral resources using existing infrastructure

1.4.14 Employment

The operation would use existing employees from the existing quarry

ASSESSMENT (+) Retention of employees

Infrastructure: Access arrangements

1.4.15 The mineral would be delivered to markets by road. All lorries would leave the site via the existing access road and would turn right, onto London Road, joining the main road network at Thulston Roundabout. No delivery vehicles would pass through Shardlow or travel on Ambaston Lane or the B5010 to Borrowash.

ASSESSMENT (+) The site has direct access to an A road

Resources/Yield

1.4.16 This site is likely to yield 1.5 million tonnes of sand and gravel from an extraction area of 40 hectares. This equates to 37,500 tph.

ASSESSMENT (-) Yield 25,000 - 50,000 tph

Transport - Mode

1.4.17 The company has confirmed that the processed material would be transported to and from this site by road.

ASSESSMENT (-) Road transport proposed

Transport - Distance to Markets

1.4.18 The mineral would be used to supply local construction markets and concrete products manufacturing and ready mixed concrete manufacture. There is an existing concrete/mortar plant on site. The main market areas for the mineral are Derby, south Derbyshire, north Leicestershire and south-west Nottinghamshire.

ASSESSMENT (++) Average distance to markets less than 20 miles

ECONOMIC TOTAL =20/24

SOCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Visual Intrusion

1.4.19 Some properties on the southern edge of Borrowash, some 200m away, may have views across the northern part of the site from their upper floors. The northern section of the site would also be visible from the footpath between Borrowash Bridge and Ambaston village which lies some 1000m from the south-eastern site boundary. Beechwood camp/caravan site which lies some 200m to the south of the site would be screened by trees/hedgerows on its northern boundary. There are open views from several residential properties and the main entrance to Elvaston Castle and Country Park which lie immediately across the road which forms the western boundary. Overall, the site has some visual receptors which have views of several parts of the site.

ASSESSMENT (-) The site has some visually sensitive receptors and/or some parts of the site will be visible

Noise

1.4.20 Noise would be generated by the operations to be carried out at the site, chiefly from soil and overburden movement, sand and gravel extraction and transportation from the site to the existing processing plant by conveyor.

1.4.21 The nearest noise sensitive properties are the residential dwellings and Elvaston Castle and Country Park immediately to the west and Beechwood Caravan Park which lies approximately 200 m to the south. Properties on the southern edge of Borrowash lie some 200 m to the north across a busy railway line. Properties in Elvaston village lie some 300 - 500 m from the southern boundary.

ASSESSMENT (-) The site has somenoise sensitive receptors within 500m from the boundary of the site

Nuisance Dust

1.4.22 Dust tends not to be a major problem associated with the extraction of river gravels due to the wet nature of the mineral, which acts as a natural dust suppressant. The nearest dust sensitive properties are those referred to in the noise section, which lie very close to the western and southern boundaries. Other sensitive properties include those on the southern edge of Borrowash lie some 200m to the north and properties in Elvaston village which lie some 300 - 500m from the southern boundary.

ASSESSMENT (-) The site has some dust sensitive receptors within 500m from the boundary of the site

Air Quality/Human Health

1.4.23 The site does not lie within or within 1000m of any designated Air Quality Management Areas in which air quality objectives are not being met, which so far in Derby and Derbyshire have been associated with road traffic pollution.

ASSESSMENT (+) The site does not lie within 1000m of an AQMA.

Transport - Local Amenity

1.4.24 All mineral would be transported from the site to market by road. All lorries would leave the site via the existing access road and would turn right, onto London Road, joining the main road network at Thulston Roundabout. No delivery vehicles would pass through Shardlow, or travel on Ambaston Lane or the B5010 to Borrowash.

ASSESSMENT(++) Heavy goods vehicles would pass no sensitive receptors to reach the main market areas

Potential Benefits of the Proposed After-Use

1.4.25 The company suggests that a continuation of the reclamation scheme for the current quarry would be appropriate for this site. Restoration would be to a mixture of agricultural land, conservation and low key amenity uses. It is unlikely that the site would be suitable for the importation of fill material, due to the lack of access and, therefore, any restoration proposals would need to be implemented using fill material generated on site. In practice, this is likely to result in a substantial area of water.

1.4.26 The site offers some opportunities to create or enhance habitats and to enhance landscape character. It is a very sensitive site for East Midlands Airport, providing a major constraint on the design of restoration in terms of landscape and biodiversity features. There may be opportunities to provide links to Elvaston Castle and Country Park. In particular there may be an opportunity to improve the Derwent Valley Way to 'multi-user greenway' standards and to assist with the provision of a bridle bridge across the River Derwent at Ambaston Ford. This has been a long standing need for horse riding in the area and would provide a strategic link to the Midshires Way long distance bridle route.

ASSESSMENT (+) Two of the benefits (social, economic, environmental) arising from the proposed after-use.

Cumulative Impact

1.2.27 There are existing mineral workings in the area and have been for a significant number of years .

ASSESSMENT (--)Impacts from past and existing mineral workings

Airport safeguarding

1.4.28 Consultation with East Midlands Airport has established the degree to which the suggested site poses a potential risk to aircraft safety taking into account how the airport operates. This site is within the 13 km safeguarding zone around the airport lying some 7-8 kilometres to the north east of the airport and under a flight path. East Midlands Airport have indicated that this site lies within an area where there is a high potential risk of birdstrike.

ASSESSMENT (-) Site lies within an area where there is a high potential risk of birdstrike

SOCIAL TOTAL = 19/29

 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Water Environment

1.4.29 The site is situated on a Minor Aquifer but is not within a Groundwater Source Protection Zone. Given that the site is located adjacent or near to a water course or other surrounding water features, i.e. the River Derwent, it would require dewatering. A detailed EIA would be required detailing the effects of this de-watering on the surrounding water environment and what mitigation measures, if any, are required to deal with any adverse impacts. Correct pollution prevention procedures would need to be followed to prevent contamination of groundwater and the surrounding water environment.

1.4.30 The site lies within the floodplain of the Derwent, in a Flood Zone 3 where there is a high risk of flooding and therefore a flood risk assessment would be required by the EA. The assessment would need to cover as a minimum:

  • That the physical integrity of any watercourses will be safeguarded by allowing adequate margins between the banks of the watercourse and excavation unless circumstances allow for the 'stand-off strip' to be worked
  • That the effectiveness of local land drainage systems will be preserved
  • That the functioning of the natural floodplain will be preserved

Water Environment - Flooding

1.4.31 The site lies within the Trent floodplain within Flood Zone 3 where there is a high risk of flooding.

ASSESSMENT (--)The site lies within flood zone 3 where there is a high probability of flooding.

Water Environment - Groundwater

1.4.32 The site lies outside a groundwater protection zone.

ASSESSMENT (+) The site lies outside a groundwater protection zone.

Water Environment - Aquifer

1.4.33 Site lies on a minor Aquifer.

ASSESSMENT (-) Site lies on a minor Aquifer.

Ecology

Presence or absence of existing impacts from mineral extraction

1.4.34 None.

ASSESSMENT (--)None, or insignificant, impacts from mineral extraction on habitats within or adjacent to the site

Presence or absence of priority habitats and species

1.4.35 Semi-improved pasture and remnant hedgerows adjacent to River Derwent. Arable fields in centre, improved pasture to south. Occasional scattered trees of varying age and condition, a group of willows and evidence of and lost hedgerows. Hedgerow condition very variable. No records.

ASSESSMENT (-)Some areas of positive ecological value including UK priority habitats and species which should be considered for protection/conservation

Ecological coherence: Natural Areas, Wildlife Corridors, Linkages

1.4.36 Few characteristics that accord with the priority habitats of the Natural Area. Coherence with river though cut off by flood bank, and with similar landscapes to east.

ASSESSMENT (-)The proposed site generally accords with the established habitats over a wider area (or in part) but the condition of habitats is poor OR few features within the site but encompassed by landscapes which have ecological coherence

Habitat Creation

1.4.37 Site offers some opportunities to create or enhance habitats within its boundaries but does not make linkages to wider area. A very sensitive site for East Midlands Airport, providing a major constraint in designing acceptable restoration of landscape and biodiversity which is also sustainable.

ASSESSMENT (+)The site offers some opportunities to create or enhance UK or local priority habitats within its boundaries, making overall habitat gain, but may not make appropriate linkages to wider area.

Landscape and Visual Amenity

Existing Impacts from mineral extraction

1.4.38 The proposed site is located in the strategic area to the east of Hilton. The Landscape Character Area data records the immediate area as having insignificant or no impacts associated with mineral extraction.

ASSESSMENT (--)There are insignificant impacts associated with past mineral working.

Existing Infrastructure

1.4.39 There is existing infrastructure in the locality,however it is some distance from the site and separated by Elvaston Castle Eastern Avenue and Ambaston Lane so there could be significant adverse impacts associated with connecting to it.

ASSESSMENT (-)There is existing infrastructure within the vicinity of the proposed site but there may be significant adverse impacts associated with connecting to it

Strength of Landscape Character

1.4.40 The northern part of the site directly south of the River Derwent and north-east of Elvaston Castlecomprises of unimproved pasture with remnant hedgerows. The central area is predominantly arable fields with improved pasture to the south. There are occasional scattered trees of varying age and condition, a group of willows and evidence of lost hedgerows. Hedgerow condition is very variable. The proposed site has a few characteristics that accord with the established character of the Riverside Meadows and the condition is generally poor.

ASSESSMENT (+)The proposed site has few characteristics that accord with the established landscape character and the condition is poor and the enhancement of the landscape would be beneficial

Visual Impact

1.4.41 There would be potential views of the northern part of the site from a few residential properties in Borrowash across the River Derwent and the footpath that runs along the north bank of the river. The River Derwent Heritage Trail on the south bank of the river, which crosses the northern part of the site, would have views of this northern section. There may be views from the B5010, the entrance to Elvaston car park and Woodside properties. Overall the site has some visual receptors seeing several parts of the site.

ASSESSMENT (-) The site has some visual receptors and/or some parts of the site will be visible

Historic Environment

Designated sites &settings

1.4.42 Elvaston Castle Country Park is situated across the road from the site's western boundary and forms a well-used and valuable local recreational amenity. The Castle and Gardens are Grade II* Listed Buildings. The Eastern Avenue, which adjoins the southern boundary is an integral component of the gardens. Working is likely to impact on the setting of the Castle, Park and Gardens.

ASSESSMENT (--)Impact on a Grade I or II* designation, SAM and/or its setting

Archaeological Environment

1.4.43 Some remnants of ridge and furrow adjacent to the river vestigial remains elsewhere of once very extensive open fields. Known palaeochannels adjacent to the river which may have considerable potential. No known sites or finds.

ASSESSMENT(+)Occasional or localised earthworks (may not be visually evident) and/or known archaeology with limited potential for buried remains

Historic Landscape Character

1.4.44 Pattern established by 1776 but altered thereafter and only remnant of original remains.

ASSESSMENT(+)Remnant field patterns with significant boundary loss.

Best and most versatile agricultural land

1.4.45 According to DEFRA`s Predictive Agricultural Land Classification Map the site lies in an area where 20% to 60% of the land is likely to be classed as bmv.

ASSESSMENT (+) The site lies in an area where there is a moderate likelihood of 'best and most versatile' agricultural land

 

ENVIRONMENTAL TOTAL = 32/56(M)