Towards a Minerals Local Plan for Derbyshire and Derby

Towards Strategic Sustainability Principles

Key Spatial Principles - Spatial Strategy

  1. Key Spatial Principles - Spatial Strategy

 

4.1    Introduction

From discussions and comments that have been received as part of the on-going process of engagement on the MLP, people have told us broadly where and how they think future mineral extraction should take place in Derbyshire and Derby.  Taking account of these comments and other considerations, this section sets out firstly, in broad terms, where sites could be worked for minerals over the Plan period.  Secondly, it sets out the key spatial principles that will guide mineral development in the Plan area, both allocations in the Plan and other proposals which come forward over the Plan period.  This spatial element is an important aspect of the Plan, giving a geographic dimension to the vision. 

4.2    National Policy Considerations

To ensure that adequate provision can be made, the National Planning Policy Framework sets out the requirement for mineral planning authorities to maintain a steady and adequate supply of minerals.  It states that this provision should take the form of specific sites, preferred areas and/or areas of search.  For the minerals found in the Plan area, it sets out that landbanks of at least 7 years should be maintained for sand and gravel, at least 10 years for crushed rock and at least 25 years for brick clay.

National Planning Practice Guidance states that all sites should be considered on their own merits, taking into account issues such as:

  • need for the specific mineral
  • economic considerations (such as being able to continue to extract the resource, retaining jobs, being able to utilise existing plant and other infrastructure), and
  • positive and negative environmental impacts (including the feasibility of a strategic approach to restoration).For aggregate minerals, mineral planning authorities are now required by national policy to determine their own aggregate provision through the preparation of a Local Aggregate Assessment (LAA).   A separate paper will seek your views on the emerging vision and objectives for the MLP. They will contain matters relating to the requirement to contribute to the national and local mineral supply by maintaining an adequate and steady supply of minerals and the need to provide minerals for the delivery of sustainable economic development and regeneration of Derbyshire and Derby.4.4    Progress So Far – What you have said and how we have respondedBroad Location of New Mineral Workings Throughout the engagement process on the MLP, people have highlighted issues which are appropriate to include within the spatial strategy. These include a preference for extensions to existing sites rather than wholly new sites because they make best use of existing resources and infrastructure, and for these sites to be in locations which minimise disruption to local communities and the local environment. In response to what people have told us through the engagement process and taking account of national minerals policy and guidance, the Plan will give preference to extensions to existing mineral workings because they make the best and most efficient use of resources and existing infrastructure. These extensions to sites will be allocated in locations that will minimise transportation distances, and that seek, as far as is possible, to use more sustainable modes of transport. Map 1: Derbyshire and Derby’s Mineral Resources This will represent the most sustainable approach to site selection in overall terms, making best use of resources and infrastructure, helping to reduce harmful emissions, minimising the impacts of mineral development on the causes of climate change, including reducing the incidence of flooding (See the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment). In accordance with what people have told us, the Plan will also help to ensure that sites for all types of mineral working are developed in a way which respects the social and environmental sensitivities of the area.In terms of aggregate, further provision will be achieved to some extent by ensuring the availability of sufficient sites that produce secondary and recycled aggregates. Not all primary minerals can be replaced by these alternatives, however; industry often requires primary minerals because of their specific qualities, and also the availability of alternative materials can be less reliable. As a result, it will be necessary to allocate sites for the primary extraction of sand and gravel in the Plan to meet additional identified needs for aggregate, in accordance with the provision set out in the Local Aggregate Assessment. The site selection process will include criteria that reflect the principles in the spatial strategy and any other sites that come forward during the Plan period will be judged against the same principles. There are already sufficient reserves of aggregate grade crushed rock to meet identified needs for this mineral over the Plan period, so new allocations will not be included in the MLP for this mineral. In terms of non-aggregate minerals, there is likely to be a requirement to allocate sites in the Plan for industrial limestone. Proposals may also come forward for other minerals, such as coal and other hydrocarbons, and these will be considered against the principles set out in this spatial strategy.  The strategic restoration of mineral workings will be an important consideration from the initial stages in planning for new quarries or for proposals for extensions to existing ones. Operators will be required to show that restored quarries will provide real and substantial benefits to the local community and to the environment and that the restoration scheme is not planned in isolation i.e. it has taken account of the wider area. This was not included as a specific issue in the Issues and Options Paper, so has not been assessed in the Interim Sustainability Appraisal.

    Emerging Policy SMP4: Spatial Strategy

    Proposals for mineral development in Derbyshire and Derby which embrace the following spatial principles will be supported:

    • Where proposals ensure the availability of sites and facilities for the production of secondary and/or recycled materials which can substitute for primary minerals.
    • Where sites are proposed for primary mineral production, it can be shown that the need for the mineral cannot be met from sources of secondary and/or recycled materials and that it provides overall gains across the three sustainability themes, giving priority to the extension of existing sites.
    • Where the site is in a location where the use of sustainable modes of transport can be maximised thus helping to ensure that the development minimises its impact on the causes of climate change.
    • Where development will be located which minimises adverse impacts on the local environment and the amenity and quality of life of local communities, including where maximum use will be made of the primary road network to reduce the need for transport through villages.
    • Where the strategic restoration of mineral workings has been considered from the outset in their planning and development and that the sites will be restored at the earliest opportunity and in the most appropriate manner for the area, resulting in after-uses which provide benefits to the environment and local communities.
     

    Do you agree with this policy? Is there anything else that you think should be included? Please explain the reasons for your answer.

     
           
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  • Spatial Principles
  • People have recognised throughout the engagement process that any strategy for minerals planning is constrained by the geographic distribution of mineral resources in the Plan area. These are shown on the map below. This means that minerals can only be extracted where they occur naturally. In broad terms, therefore, this means that sand and gravel will be extracted in the south of the Plan area and limestone (Carboniferous and Permian) in the more central, north-western and north-eastern parts of the Plan area. Coal and other hydrocarbons are found in the more eastern parts of the Plan area.
  • 4.3    Key Objectives
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