Waste Plan: Big Choices

Derby & Derbyshire Waste Core Strategy: Big Choices Report

Chapter 6 What and Where?

6.1 Some decisions about providing for waste in Derby and Derbyshire have already been made by government policies for the country and the region. Nevertheless, there are some decisions that our waste plan will have to make. We would like your views.

6.2 We suggest that, before making the choices below, you read Background Papers 1 and 2 (the Needs Paper and the Types of Facility Paper). When you have made the choices, please complete the attached questionnaire or give your views by email to < wasteminsldf@derbyshire.gov.uk > or by post to Development Plans Team (Waste), Derbyshire County Council, Shand House, Dale Road South, Matlock DE4 3RY.

BIG CHOICE A: MORE TREATMENT, LESS LANDFILL

6.3 As explained in paragraph 4.19, there are government targets which set minimum levels of composting, recycling and other forms of treatment of waste. The residual waste (that which the targets do not require to be treated) may be landfilled. However, it does not have to be landfilled. We could plan for higher levels of treatment, which would postpone the need to find more landfill space and would agree with the waste hierarchy[1]. But, as explained in paragraph 4.23, it may be unrealistic to expect so much new treatment capacity to be built so soon.

1. Waste Hierarchy - see Appendix 1 [back]

Big Choice A (i)

What proportions of recycling & composting and other forms of treatment should the plan aim for?

Option Results Count
Option 1 is "Aim for the minimum regional and government targets and those recently achieved for recycling, composting and recovery of value."
Option 2 is "Aim for higher levels of recycling & composting and other forms of treatment."
An alternative option

Big Choice A (ii)

Please tell us which option you prefer or, if you don't like these, suggest other options:

315 people have answered this question.

BIG CHOICE B: THE PATTERN OF DEVELOPMENT

6.4 There will always be some small-scale waste management developments, to provide waste transfer facilities[2] and to service particular local needs. For example, the government is keen on anaerobic digestion[3], which can be viable at quite small sizes on farms and sewage works. Indeed, it may be possible for most waste management development to be local, with a large number of small-scale treatment facilities processing most of the waste.

6.5 Local provision may provide a sustainable pattern which reduces the waste management industry’s carbon footprint but may not be practicable because it may lack the economies of scale that large facilities may offer – and the economics of development is a crucial factor for the waste management industry. These considerations are discussed in more detail in chapter 4.

6.6 Whilst the plan should guide the waste management industry towards a sustainable pattern of development, it should not be trying to limit the industry to any particular technology that may become out-dated during the plan period. So, whatever pattern of facilities the plan proposes, it must not be too prescriptive.

2. Waste transfer station - see Types of facilities Paper [back]
3. Anaerobic Digestion - see Types of Facilities paper [back]

Big Choice B (i)

What should be the overall pattern of waste management facilities in the plan area?

Option Results Count
Option 1 is "A few, large facilities, mainly in the Derby and Chesterfield areas, with various transfer stations serving them."
Option 2 is "A more diverse pattern, with local areas taking responsibility for their waste."
An alternative option

Big Choice B (ii)

Please tell us which option you prefer or, if you don't like these, suggest other options:

115 people have answered this question.

BIG CHOICE C: URBAN OR RURAL

6.7 All types of waste management development have environmental impacts, particularly if not well designed and run. On the other hand, many carry out their business in urban areas and raise few complaints from neighbouring firms or homes.

6.8 As stated in paragraph 4.18, there are no government or regional policies that require development to be located in towns. Such locations are usually more sustainable for all types of development and most waste comes from those areas. However, the development of large waste management facilities in areas where population densities are high can cause much anxiety for the people who live and work near them and, if there are adverse impacts, they will affect more people.

6.9 Rural locations may be remote from the sources of the waste, with greater travel distances adding to climate change, and may result in more lorries on country roads. However, rural locations might reduce the anxieties and avoid adverse impacts on people’s homes and workplaces.

Big Choice C (i)

Should the plan aim for some new facilities to be in rural areas? If so, what types of facilities?

Option Results Count
Option 1 is "Yes. As many types as possible, to minimise impacts on peoples' homes and workplaces."
Option 2 is "Yes, but restricted to the types of facility that can comfortably be accommodated amongst or near farm or other rural buildings."
Option 3 is "No. The plan should protect the countryside from the impacts of waste developments."
An alternative option

Big Choice C (ii)

Please tell us which option you prefer or, if you don't like these, suggest other options:

113 people have answered this question.

BIG CHOICE D: PROMOTING DERBY AND DERBYSHIRE

6.10 As discussed in paragraphs 4.29-4.36, there are advantages in promoting a vibrant waste industry. They include attracting modern technologies to the area and also opportunities for manual employment.

6.11 The plan might try to capitalise on the potential economic benefits which the waste management industry can offer to Derby and Derbyshire. Perhaps it might put forward proposals for specialist technological sites or resource recovery parks, which may bring benefits not just to the waste industry but to the wider economy of the plan area[4].

4. Resource Recovery Parks - see Types of Facilities Paper [back]

Big Choice D (i)

Should the plan try positively to attract waste management firms to Derby and Derbyshire, for example by providing for the development of specialist technological sites or resource recovery parks?

Option Results Count
Option 1 is "Yes, as much as possible."
Option 2 is "Yes but not to the extent that it would make Derby and Derbyshire a net importer of waste."
Option 3 is "No, because any economic benefits would be outweighed by the problems it would bring."
An alternative option

Big Choice D (ii)

Please tell us which option you prefer or, if you don't like these, suggest other options:

105 people have answered this question.

BIG CHOICE E: LOCAL CHALLENGES

6.12 In some parts of the plan area, it will be difficult or impossible to provide sufficient landfill space or processing facilities. The difficulties may be greatest in the North-Western Derbyshire and City and Southern Derbyshire areas.

6.13 As explained in paragraph 5.11, to avoid impacts on the Peak District National Park, North-Western Derbyshire should, preferably, have only small-scale processing facilities serving the area’s needs. In City and Southern Derbyshire there may be a major and perhaps impossible challenge to find sufficient landfill space.

Big Choice E (i)

How and where should the plan make the necessary provision to address the local challenges?

Option Results Count
Option 1 is "Despite the challenges, make the provision locally."
Option 2 is "Rely on other areas to make the provision."
Option 3 is "For City and Southern Derbyshire, plan for enough treatment facilities to deal with more waste than is produced in this part of the plan area."
Option 4 is "For North-Western Derbyshire, plan for enough landfill provision to take more waste than is produced in this part of the plan area."
An alternative option

Big Choice E (ii)

Please tell us which options you prefer or, if you don't like these, suggest other options:

100 people have answered this question.

Big Choice E (iii)

Please also state whether you agree with Option 3 or suggest other options:

94 people have answered this question.

Big Choice E (iv)

Please also state whether you agree with Option 4 or suggest other options:

94 people have answered this question.

SITES QUESTIONS

Location of sites

6.14 In its Planning Policy Statement on “Planning for Sustainable Waste Management”[5], the government has made a list of the things that planners should consider when planning for waste sites. Appendix 3 to this report has a copy of the list. Perhaps there are particular considerations which you think are especially important.

6.15 For example, the waste management industry deals with a lot of biodegradable waste (waste that will rot). People who live near the plants have concerns about potential hazards. For certain types of facility, including composting, there is already a guideline that applications for sites within 250 metres of homes should be specially assessed. Perhaps you have views as to what the locational guidance should be.

5. PPS 10, DCLG, 2005 [back]

Other Question 1

Bearing in mind the list in Appendix 3, are there any particular locational considerations which you think are especially important when planning for waste sites?

130 people have answered this question.

Existing waste sites

6.16 The plan might encourage the expansion of existing waste management sites. Expansion will not always result in greater impacts on the locality. Sometimes it can enable a site to have modern buildings and to operate more efficiently and, for example, quietly.

Other Question 2

Do you know of any existing sites which you think should not be allowed to expand? If so, why should they not be allowed to expand?

116 people have answered this question.

Other Question 3

Do you know of any existing sites which you think should be allowed to expand? If so, would you like to see the site improved and how?

100 people have answered this question.

Future waste management sites

6.17 The plan might identify some crucial sites or areas for waste management development. “Crucial” sites will be those which the plan will need to identify in order to show that enough treatment or landfill sites can be provided in Derby and Derbyshire. They will mainly be for the facilities that will be essential for treating large quantities of industrial and commercial waste.

Other Question 4

Do you know of any sites or areas which would be suitable for the essential development described in the Big Choices Report?

112 people have answered this question.

WHAT ELSE?

6.18 Words such as “waste”, “waste management”, “recycling”, “energy from waste can raise a lot of issues in people’s minds. You may have concerns or interests relating to waste which we cannot address in this waste plan. Nevertheless, you may consider that the county or city council or the government should in some way be addressing them.

Other Question 5

Do you have other concerns or interests relating to waste development or waste management? What do you think we should be doing about them?

360 people have answered this question.